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BRITAIN could face its coldest day in five years as a brutally cold polar vortex - dubbed the 'Beast from the East' - sweeps in from Siberia.

This weekend will see temperatures plummet before lows of -10C hit early next week and snow sweeps in from southern England.

The Met Office is predicting highly disruptive snowfall across the country beginning in the South East.

A statement from the Met office said it is working with partners in road, rail and air transport to help minimise travel chaos.

From Monday, it warns to expect delays and cancellations of rail and air travel and that some rural communities could be cut off by road.

Bitter winds will make the already sub-zero temperatures feel even colder as Public Health England warns of the potentially deadly impact of the record-breaking chill.

Brent Walker, Met Office Deputy Chief Meteorologist, said: "There is potential for this cold spell to be the coldest for several years in the south”.

Forecasters say the crippling cold could last for several days and into the following week even as Spring begins next Thursday on 1 March.

The last time temperatures plummeted this low was in March 2013 when a staggering -12.9C was recorded.

Cold weather warnings have already been issued through Public Health England as the NHS is expected to be swamped with patients suffering from weather-related patients.

Dr Thomas Waite, of Public Health England’s Extreme Events team, said: "Remember keeping warm will help keep you well.”

The Met Office says wintry flurries will begin in the east today as the weather feels "increasingly cold" with a "marked windchill".

Over the weekend it will become "even colder with widespread overnight frosts and bitter by day with a marked windchill".

Its forecast added snow showers will continue in the east and southeast on Sunday before becoming "more widespread on Monday."

Coral bookmakers cut the odds on next month ending as the coldest March on record to 2-1 in light of the worrying forecasts.

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