English Dutch French German Italian Russian Spanish

A major eruption took place at Mount Sinabung, Indonesia around 09:00 UTC on April 6, 2018 shooting ash up to 15 km (50 000 feet) above sea level. The Aviation Color Code was raised to Red. This is the second major eruption of this volcano within 2 months.

The eruption produced numerous pyroclastic flows, reaching 3.5 km (2 miles) to the east and southeast.

The Darwin VAAC reported two columns of volcanic ash. The first to 15 km (50 000 feet) moving NNE, and the second to 7.3 km (24 000 feet) moving SW.

Today's eruption is comparable to a high impact eruption of February 19, 2018. At the time pyroclastic flows traveled 3.5 km (2.1 miles) and 4.9 km (3 miles) from the summit and ash plume reached an altitude of 16.7 km (55 000 feet) above sea level.

Sinabung eruption April 6, 2018

Mount Sinabung erupting on April 6, 2018. Credit: Sutopo Purwo Nugroho

The Darwin VAAC reported two columns of volcanic ash. The first to 15 km (50 000 feet) moving NNE, and the second to 7.3 km (24 000 feet) moving SW.

Today's eruption is comparable to a high impact eruption of February 19, 2018. At the time pyroclastic flows traveled 3.5 km (2.1 miles) and 4.9 km (3 miles) from the summit and ash plume reached an altitude of 16.7 km (55 000 feet) above sea level.

Mount Sinabung erupting on April 6, 2018. Credit: Magma Indonesia

Sinabung's first eruption in known history took place in August 2010. It lasted about a month and had Volcanic Explosivity Index of 2. Seismicity fluctuated until September 2013, when dense white plumes started rising 100 to 150 m (328 to 492 feet) above the crater.

Sinabung's first major eruption in known history occurred on September 17, 2013 and the volcano remains active ever since. Tens of thousands have been evacuated. Between February 2014 and May 2016, eruptions at Mount Sinabung claimed lives of 23 people.

Geological summary

Gunung Sinabung is a Pleistocene-to-Holocene stratovolcano with many lava flows on its flanks. The migration of summit vents along a N-S line gives the summit crater complex an elongated form. The youngest crater of this conical, 2 460-m-high (8 070 feet) andesitic-to-dacitic volcano is at the southern end of the four overlapping summit craters.

An unconfirmed eruption was noted in 1881, and solfataric activity was seen at the summit and upper flanks in 1912.

No confirmed historical eruptions were recorded prior to explosive eruptions during August - September 2010 that produced ash plumes to 5 km (16 404 feet) above the summit. (GVP)

Featured image: Eruption of Mount Sinabung on April 9, 2018. Credit: Sutopo Purwo Nugroho

 

An earthquake with an upgraded magnitude of 5.3 struck 38 miles south west of Ventura in the Channel Islands area about 12:30 p.m. Shaking was felt all along the coast, from the San Luis Obispo area to the north to San Clemente in the south. More than 10,000 people reported feeling the quake on the USGS homepage

Shaking was felt in the Los Angeles area early Thursday afternoon as an earthquake with preliminary magnitude of 5.3 struck off the coast in the Channel Islands.

The temblor hit beneath the Pacific Ocean about 12:29 p.m., at a depth of about 10 miles beneath the surface, USGS reported. It was centered about 41 miles southwest of Ventura and 85 miles west of Los Angeles.

The Los Angeles Fire Department is in “earthquake mode” following the shaking, as is standard protocol.

Shaking was felt all along the coast, from the San Luis Obispo area to the north to San Clemente in the south, USGS reported.

On social media, people across the Southern California region reported feeling the quake, with many describing it as “rolling.”

One woman said the quake’s “rolling motion” caused walls to creak and items to swing in Torrance. Others described feeling the temblor from as far away as San Jacinto and central Orange County.

he 2014 La Habra quake is the most recent temblor of this size, she said. That quake was a 5.1. For perspective, the 1994 Northridge quake would have had 50 to 60 times as much energy.

The Ventura County Fire Department reminded residents that earthquakes — “even smaller ones” — are good reminders for everyone to prepare.

Ventura County Fire Department Capt. Steve Swindle told KTLA he was at the agency’s headquarters in Camarillo when the earthquake hit and he felt it.

He said that during a tremor, officials at stations countywide put out their apparatuses and fire engines so they can be prepared to respond in the event of an aftershock.

He advised residents of Ventura County to visit VCreadysetgo.org and be prepared for other incidents.

It is Southern California, we are earthquake country. We know that it’s coming,” Swindle said. “Being prepared is always your best bet to help yourself.

Go to top