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Scientific research suggests the Earth's changing magnetic field may cause otherwise peaceful animals to become enraged killers banding together in voracious indiscriminate attacks and killing both terrified humans and each other.

Rise of the 'zombie' animals?

Imagine for a moment a scene from Alfred Hitchcock's classic horror movie "The Birds": townspeople are inexplicably attacked by the creatures. Darting and screeching, once docile birds swoop and soar, purposefully striking from the skies to maim and kill.

Unlike Hitchcock's film, the death from the skies would be joined by attacks on the ground. Demented armies of zombie-like animals—rats, squirrels, raccoons, even beloved pets—could turn on humans in frenzied, bloody assaults.

Much of Mankind would wonder if the biblical Apocalypse had arrived.

Some worry that this terrifying scenario will come to fruition. If it does humanity is basically helpless.

Recent mass animal deaths hint at things more sinister

During the final months of 2010 and the beginning of 2011, much attention was focused on mass animal deaths occurring throughout the world. Speculation revolved around many different causes, the most popular one being the current magnetic polar shift.

Although the hypothesis was dismissed as being unsupported by scientific evidence, that was not quite true. Scientific research does exist that tends to support the bizarre behavior of such suicidal animals.

Worse, that same research suggests the possibility that as the magnetic field becomes more unstable and the flux intensifies, masses of animals could literally lose their minds and embark on frenzied, murderous rampages. Every human would be at risk, for even a crazed squirrel can kill an unarmed person.

Beached whales point to future danger for humans

Captain David Williams of the Deafwhale Society asserts that for some time his organization and teams of researchers have known the reason why whales beach themselves. The answer, he claims, is the phenomena of "barotrauma" caused by deep sea quakes.

The quakes create powerful waves and currents under the ocean that slam submerged creatures. Such force damages their brains and circulatory systems. As the internal injuries progress over weeks or months, the creatures seek to end their intense pain by literally beaching themselves—committing suicide to end their misery.

It's a phenomena that seems sporadic and strictly tied to the undersea quakes. Yet many of the quakes have links to changes in the Earth's magnetic field and the spinning liquid core that moves the tectonic plates precipitating the phenomena that ends in the deaths of sea creatures.

Geomagnetic fields, earthquakes and animals

Most people are unaware that magnetic field fluctuations can precipitate earthquakes and initiate strange mass animal behavior.

Yet it's been demonstrated that changes in the geomagnetosphere affect the Earth's plate tectonics. The reason why tectonics are affected has to do with how the Earth is built geologically. The planet s primarily a core of superheated, dense viscous liquid with a relatively thin crust floating on the surface. That segmented crust—like a cracked pie crust—is what comprises the tectonic plates. They are in constant movement chiefly due to massive currents deep within the planet's mantle and molten core.

The edges where two plates meet are called faults. Faults relieve the titanic internal pressure of the planet. The faults buckle and create mountains, rifts, and volcanic conduits. Some faults are structured differently than others and exhibit different qualities.

Geomagnetic flux, often a precursor to mighty quakes, is sometimes accompanied by strange harmonics: people see colors dancing in the sky or hear what sounds like discordant music.

Animal and human brains can be greatly affected by permutations of the magnetic field and by intense solar flare activity. Research has revealed that all forms of life on Earth are affected to a degree by the variable solar-planetary-geomagnetic field matrix.

The geomagnetic field also affects critical brain rhythms and the normal hormonal balances. Many studies have proven that as hormones vary, so do the emotions and their intensity. It's true of both humans and animals.

Studies over the decades of mass human behavior have shown a correlation between the increase and decrease of wars that follows an approximate 11-year cycle. That cycle corresponds to the 11-year sunspot cycle and periods of increased geomagnetic activity. One of the most persuasive studies conducted on the relationship between increased irrationality and the solar cycles was undertaken by the late Professor Raymond Wheeler at the University of Kansas.

The ominous emergence of magnetic torsion fields

As the flux in the Earth's dynamic magnetic field becomes more erratic and the intensity of the field fluctuates to a greater degree, the formation of energetic torsion fields can increase.

A torsion field, as defined by A. Akimov, can manifest within an electrical field in a state of flux. They are distinct energy fields that can interact and affect both energy and matter. Some experimenters have found evidence that their emanations sometimes appear to exceed the speed of light.

Torsion fields can change the light frequency of laser beams, affect electrical components, modify gravity waves, and impact biological processes. The primary biological functions the fields affect are the brains of animals.

Akimov's experiments revealed that torsion fields can influence consciousness including the process of thought. Within a fluctuating magnetic field—such as an unstable geomagnetic field—intense, dangerous psychosis can be induced. Both animals and humans are susceptible.

The Russian's research was published in New Energy.

Magnetic fields, the brain and insanity

In recent years researchers have brought to light much new information that shows strong links between magnetic fields and the working of the brain. Although most of the work has focused on humans, it applies to animals as well.

Magnetic fields have been shown to augment the brain process in good and bad ways. ["Magnetic fields may help brain work"]

For instance, studies have shown that the brain's right temporo-parietal junction lights up with activity when decisions are made. An MIT team showed that an electromagnetic field impairs the ability to evaluate the intentions of others, leaves perceptions confused and creates poor judgment. ["A Magnetic Field Applied to the Brain Can Alter People's Sense of Morality"]

Other experiments have suggested that chronic exposure to variable magnetic field intensities can cause adverse affects on the brain and electrochemical thought processes to intensify. That can lead to to impaired judgment, aberrations in perception, psychotic behavior, paranoia and heightened bouts of rage.

Mass animal deaths may be the early symptoms of this encroaching electrical brain disruption caused by the magnetic pole shift.

Scientists McCormick and Flavio Frohlich introduced slow oscillation signals into brain tissue. The experiment revealed that the signal created a feedback loop changing the electrical field guiding neural activity. In turn that strengthened the electrical field.

“It’s like asking whether the roar of the crowd in the football stadium also influences you to cheer as well. And in turn, your cheering encourages others to cheer along with you.” McCormick said. ["Study Shows Electrical Fields Influence Brain Activity"]

A ubiquitous changing field—like the planet's magnetic field shifting—has an impact on mass animal behavior and can eventually ignite violent, killer reactions and general mass hysteria in an affected animal population. It's permutations are also unpredictable.

Animal wars under the auroras?

As solar flares light up the night skies and the unstoppable magnetic polar shift intensifies, havoc may ensue. Bizarre animal attacks on humans may increase and in certain regions humans may need to travel cautiously and very well-armed.

Wars and uprisings may increase. Already unrest is spreading throughout the Middle East and northern Africa. Some experts see potential uprisings spreading to Europe, Asia and the Americas.

If some of the theories on the interaction between the brain and the magnetic field are true, then the coming years may hold the terrors of an apocalyptic animal uprising of such ferocity that it may someday be remembered simply as "the animal wars."

 

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